Is there any java example of verification of JWT for aws cognito API?

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I am using aws cognito user pool, after user signed in, I got an id token at my single page application, which is expected, then for each request, I need to verify the id token at my backend rest API, which is in java, the aws doc didn’t mention too much about how to do it.

Is there any example for it?

Confusions include:

  1. the id token seems not just a signed JWT, it’s also encrypted, when use nimbus library, I need to specify a secret for an encrypted JWT, where can I get the secret? my understanding is this should come from aws, do I needed to download something and then put in my jvm keystore?

  2. there is a well-known jwts.json can be downloaded from aws, it looks like:

`

{
    "keys": [
        {
            "alg": "RS256",
            "e": "AQAB",
            "kid": "HFPWHdsrG5WyulOwH5dai69YTsWz2KBB1NHbAcVx7M0=",
            "kty": "RSA",
            "n": "...",
            "use": "sig"
        },
        {
            "alg": "RS256",
            "e": "AQAB",
            "kid": "kSwTdVq/qD4Ra4Q8dJqUTlvOA7eiLxezOZ3mJKI61zU=",
            "kty": "RSA",
            "n": "....",
            "use": "sig"
        }
    ]
}

`

how to understand this, what does each property used for? is that every user in the user pool represents one key?

  1. Is there any example java code for the aws cognito service verification, can I use aws sdk or I have to use library like nimbus to do the verification on my own?

Answer

I just struggled with this and thought I share it.

If you use maven add this to your pom.xml

<dependency>
    <groupId>com.auth0</groupId>
    <artifactId>java-jwt</artifactId>
    <version>3.3.0</version>
</dependency>
<dependency>
    <groupId>com.auth0</groupId>
    <artifactId>jwks-rsa</artifactId>
    <version>0.4.0</version>
</dependency>

If you use gradle add

compile 'com.auth0:jwks-rsa:0.4.0'
compile 'com.auth0:java-jwt:3.3.0'

Create a class that implements RSAKeyProvider

import com.auth0.jwk.JwkException;
import com.auth0.jwk.JwkProvider;
import com.auth0.jwk.JwkProviderBuilder;
import com.auth0.jwt.interfaces.RSAKeyProvider;

import java.net.MalformedURLException;
import java.net.URL;
import java.security.interfaces.RSAPrivateKey;
import java.security.interfaces.RSAPublicKey;

public class AwsCognitoRSAKeyProvider implements RSAKeyProvider {

    private final URL aws_kid_store_url;
    private final JwkProvider provider;

    public AwsCognitoRSAKeyProvider(String aws_cognito_region, String aws_user_pools_id) {
        String url = String.format("https://cognito-idp.%s.amazonaws.com/%s/.well-known/jwks.json", aws_cognito_region, aws_user_pools_id);
        try {
            aws_kid_store_url = new URL(url);
        } catch (MalformedURLException e) {
            throw new RuntimeException(String.format("Invalid URL provided, URL=%s", url));
        }
        provider = new JwkProviderBuilder(aws_kid_store_url).build();
    }


    @Override
    public RSAPublicKey getPublicKeyById(String kid) {
        try {
            return (RSAPublicKey) provider.get(kid).getPublicKey();
        } catch (JwkException e) {
            throw new RuntimeException(String.format("Failed to get JWT kid=%s from aws_kid_store_url=%s", kid, aws_kid_store_url));
        }
    }

    @Override
    public RSAPrivateKey getPrivateKey() {
        return null;
    }

    @Override
    public String getPrivateKeyId() {
        return null;
    }
}

Now you can verify your token by

String aws_cognito_region = "us-east-1"; // Replace this with your aws cognito region
String aws_user_pools_id = "us-east-1_7DEw1nt5r"; // Replace this with your aws user pools id
RSAKeyProvider keyProvider = new AwsCognitoRSAKeyProvider(aws_cognito_region, aws_user_pools_id);
Algorithm algorithm = Algorithm.RSA256(keyProvider);
JWTVerifier jwtVerifier = JWT.require(algorithm)
    //.withAudience("2qm9sgg2kh21masuas88vjc9se") // Validate your apps audience if needed
    .build();

String token = "eyJraWQiOiJjdE.eyJzdWIiOiI5NTMxN2E.VX819z1A1rJij2"; // Replace this with your JWT token
jwtVerifier.verify(token);

Note that JwkProviderBuilder will build a JwkProvider with a LRU cache that caches keys retreived from the aws key store which is quite neat! The cache rules can be change with the builder.

[UPDATE] Moved creation JwkProvider to constructor so caching is respected as @danieln commented



Source: stackoverflow